In My Kitchen – Pork Scotch Fillet Two Ways

Do you eat pork? Not all people do, but a lot of people do eat pork in one form or another; especially those that have been processed to extend the shelf-life of the meat – such as, ham, prosciutto, sausage, gammon, bacon, pancetta, salami, and others.

Pork is probably one of the most consumed meat worldwide. I love pork in various forms. I like to cook them – in a curry or slow cook or stir-fry or even steam with eggs. But, my favourite has to be a roasted suckling baby pig which I will eat once a year during Chinese New Year with my family. I also like to eat at a Chicken or Duck Rice hawker stall in a “kopitiam” when I am back in Penang. Most Chicken or Duck Rice hawker stall will usually sell “Siew Yoke” (pronounced in Cantonese) or “Sioh Bak” (pronounced in Hokkien), which is a Chinese style roast pork, and “Char Siew” which is a Chinese barbeque pork.

When I first wrote this post, it was about sharing what I have cooked last night with the beautiful piece of pork fillet that I bought from our local corner grocery store, Hill Street New Town. Then, I started googling on pork and came upon several articles written on pork – the good, the bad and the ugliness of pig farming in Tasmania which was aired on ABC Stateline News on 8 May 2009. Here is the transcript on Pigs Cruelty reported by Airlie Ward. Since then, the State government has made a decision to phase out dry sow stalls from 2014 – the first state in Australia to do so. I didn’t realise eating pork is quite controversial as pigs are intelligent and cognitive, but easily misunderstood as unhygienic mammal feeding on anything and everything, as demonstrated by the many readers in Queen Tiji’s blog and post, “The Facts About Eating Pork”. After reading all the 68 comments posted on QT’s blog and still growing, I am starting to wonder if I should eat pork at all.

I guess I will continue to eat pork as long as I know where it comes from and ethically produced. If Australia pig farming and industry leaves question to be asked, I wonder what it is like back in Malaysia. Anyhow, I know that the piece of pork fillet that I bought from Hill Street is ethically produced in a small farm in Scottsdale.

Course 1: Lemongrass Pork

The pork fillet that I bought was large enough to make two dishes. First, with a sharp knife, I sliced the pork thinly and marinated with a bit of light soy sauce, salt, white pepper and corn starch. Then, I leave the marinated pork in the fridge while I prepare the other ingredients.

Ingredients:

1 lemongrass

1 red onion

10 sweet basil leaves

1 bird eye chili

2 cloves garlic

2 small red capsicum

8 white mushrooms

Preparation:

Slice the lemongrass finely and set aside until ready to cook

Chop the garlic and chili finely and set aside until ready to cook

Cut the capsicum and mushroom into bite pieces and set aside until ready to cook

Cut the red onion into small sections and set aside until ready to cook

Pluck and remove basil leaves from the stem and set aside until ready to cook

Cooking:

Heat the wok on high flame. Add 1 cup of cooking oil

Toss in garlic, chili and lemongrass. Stir fry until fragrant

Add half the marinated pork. Give it a quite toss. Then add the mushroom and onion. Mix through and continue to stir fry for 2-3 minutes

Add the capsicum. Add 1 tablespoon fish sauce and 2 tablespoons oyster sauce. Mix through and continue to stir fry for 2-3 minutes. Add the basil leaves and toss to mix through with the rest of the ingredients

Add a bit of salt, sugar and black cracked pepper. Remove and plate the dish

Course 2 – Nyonya style Pork Fillet

Ingredients:

3 cloves garlic

1 teaspoon brown bean paste (“Tau Cheong”)

1/4 teaspoon belachan

A pinch tamarind pulp

Preparation:

Soak a pinch of tamarind pulp in warm water to make 1 cup of tamarind juice and set aside until ready to use

Chop garlic finely and set aside until ready to cook

Cooking:

Heat the wok on high flame. Add 1 cup of cooking oil

Toss in garlic. Stir fry until fragrant

Add brown bean paste and belachan. Then add the remaining marinated pork. Mix through and stir fry for 3 minutes. Then add 1 tablespoon oyster sauce, mix through and continue to stir fry until pork is cooked

Add tamarind juice. A bit at a time. Reduce heat and slow simmer for 2 minutes

Add a dash of ground white pepper. Remove and plate the dish

Hope you enjoy my pork dishes and recipes.

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About Victor

I live in Melbourne. Blogging as a pleasure. Sharing my thoughts, mostly on food and places I find interesting. I am on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook Page which you can follow by clicking on the link on my blog page.
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3 Responses to In My Kitchen – Pork Scotch Fillet Two Ways

  1. salalao says:

    Both dishes are absolutely look gorgeous and to die for a bowel of hot steam jasmine rice and you are in heaven I guess even noodle would work too yummy- do you delivery?

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